An album that is a psychology essay, Self Esteem and her “Prioritise Pleasure”.

REVIEW

If you’re willing to go beyond the blanket of hedonism and shallowness that seems to characterise Self Esteem’s latest work, you’ll find precious treasures, uncommon introspective thoughts, and new incentives to look at life under a new light.

Modern times culture is the prairie where the black dressed cowgirl called Rebecca Taylor runs with her song writing, always sounding out the folds of human existence, the breath of human soul, through a pop music that is always choral and penetrating, inquiring and reflective.

I’m Fine” is compelling and enigmatic, a voice full of emotions that try to guide a deep groove, rounded by floaty samples like crows on a corpse abandoned in a deserted canyon.

Fucking Wizardry” is modern pop made with slightly outdated sounds, tribal and urban, with that playful organ and those exciting choirs that make it a gem of delirious happiness.

Hobbies” is all about sound layering, composed of rhythm and voices, the title track pushes the writing towards an imaginary musical, it’s a dance of emotions within the human psyche, frustrations and outbursts of freedom, the affirmation of the being through the body but never for the body, always raising the bar towards a spiritual evolution. “Moody” is commercial soul/funk, “Still Reigning” seeks its own way to be sentimental but gets bogged down in a slightly nauseating chorus.

How Can I Help You” is psychological support in the form of music, perhaps one of the songs where Rebecca gives the best of her, a horse race in the wild west of the mind, and more dangerous and fatal than ever. “Just Kids” with its synthetic strings and the melody that rises in a gospel of memory, faded memories recovered and ready to be kept by her loyal fanbase.

In conclusion, “Prioritise Pleasure” shows us that you can be pop and tell the truth about how things really are, indeed, you have to be pop to reflect exactly on existence and to avoid the risk of being misunderstood, Self Esteem does it, as the “Unapologetic pop star” she is, succeeding in all her intentions.

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An album that is a psychology essay, Self Esteem and her “Prioritise Pleasure”.
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